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Peyote Tutorial

kandi tutorial

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#1 dancefLoor

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 10:58 PM EST

Ok! This is a tutorial for a peyote! Here is one thats finished:

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I didn't take the pictures for this tutorial while making that one, so it's going to look a bit different haha. This is actually the stitching I use to make a backpack, and within the weekend I'll have a tutorial up on how to make a bag.

First step is adding an even number of beads on a piece of string. When making a bag, you really want to pull it tight... even when just making a bracelet out of peyote you need to pull it sort of tight. It's hard to leave enough slack without it getting ugly.


I use a needle on one end, and tie a random giant bead on the other to keep the string tight. THIS IS MAI SETTUP

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For zig zag pattern, you're adding 2 beads of however many colors you want in your row. For this, i'll be doing blue and purple, putting them on in sets of 2.
(ignore the blue bead on my needle completely)

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So you get to the end of your first row, and in a 2 color pattern, you add 1 of the next color. In this, the last color is blue, so I add on another purple. Then, I string it the opposite way through the 2nd to last bead I added on the first row. (As shown)

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pull it tight, it should look like this:

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To keep the pattern, add a blue and string it through the 2nd purple bead.

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Keep repeating this process till you get to the end of the 2nd row. (NOTE: The first row is very sloppy and a pain to get situated. However, once you do it should look like this)

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Now, you put on whichever color will continue the pattern above. (In this example it's blue) After adding on the blue, string backwards through the last bead you added on this row. (Also note, that this is the exact same way went from row 1 to row 2)

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After a couple rows, it will start to look like this

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As you can see, it's a lot like a multi, except you're building it in a different direction. When you get to the end you take the end of the string of the last row, and start connecting it with the first row.

Hopefully these pictures are self explanatory.


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After you thread it all the way through the row, you can untie that random bead you tied to the string to hold it tight, and tie the two ends together.

BAM! You have a peyote =)

#2 amd64bit

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 12:41 AM EST


Whoa! Ok at first look, i thought it was a multi, but then i took a close look at it and realized it wasnt..lol. Thats really cool actually, its like a ladder but like a multi too.... I will seriously be considering this for my next piece for sure.



#3 LilRaverBoi

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 09:09 AM EST


Actually, there is a slightly easier/stronger way to do this. Instead of making a flat sheet and then later connecting it into the bracelet, you can just make the bracelet in one fell-swoop. Same idea, but just tie the first row, then start your 'thru a bead, add a bead' pattern to complete the rest. With the method shown above, you have a weaker 'joint' where they two ends get connected, but in the way I do it, there is no joint...just a consistent pattern of beads/string the entire way up.



#4 WereRaver

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 10:47 AM EST


wow awsome tut! That's definitely something I wanna try out as soon as I get some more beads.



#5 XxOcStickersxX

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 01:28 PM EST


Actually, there is a slightly easier/stronger way to do this. Instead of making a flat sheet and then later connecting it into the bracelet, you can just make the bracelet in one fell-swoop. Same idea, but just tie the first row, then start your 'thru a bead, add a bead' pattern to complete the rest. With the method shown above, you have a weaker 'joint' where they two ends get connected, but in the way I do it, there is no joint...just a consistent pattern of beads/string the entire way up.

there is a video tut of this method on YouTube by alouete ??? It's some blonde chick but she has some great kandie tuts..


Good tut. Never the less



#6 LilRaverBoi

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 01:38 PM EST


there is a video tut of this method on YouTube by alouete ??? It's some blonde chick but she has some great kandie tuts..
Any way you can find that video and post it here as well? I think it'd be helpful to have everything organized to provide the best resources for members.

Thanks!



#7 XxOcStickersxX

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 01:59 PM EST


this the link www.YouTube.com/watch?v=9ZyJ1EZQs_g
On my iPhone and to lazy to write the embed code. Also this for the odd flower peyote stich but you can just change the pattern up to get the diagnal pattern.



#8 LilRaverBoi

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 02:51 PM EST


Actually, you just need the website URL like you did and it automatically embeds itself. If you try using the 'embed code' it won't work right....so you're good!

---------------------------------
In response to the video: that is again WAY too complicated!!!! Who keeps teaching all these people to make this as a band and then later connect it into a bracelet!? That's not how I learned at ALL. I guess it works, but it's pretty complicated compared to the way I do it.

I'll try to describe it here:

Get a long string....make a single at one end and tie it off. Do not cut the extra string off. You should have a single with a long string coming off. Now grab the end of the string, loop it through a bead on the single adjacent to where it's tied. Now thread a bead onto the string. Go back to the single and thread your string through another bead....but not the next one. Basically, you loop through every other bead. The bead you add each time to your string will sit above the bead you don't loop through. Continue the 'loop through a bead, add a bead' process till you get back to the start. Now you will have to loop through beads to get to the next layer. Then do the same pattern there.

This method allows you to make any thickness of cuff....and if you want to stop thin, you can...and if you want to make it thicker, you always can. The tricky part is figuring out how to get your pattern to work out right. Basically, that first single will be part of the first and second rows. Might not make sense now, but if you try it, you'll understand. Oh, and make sure to test fit the single to make sure you have the right size...you won't be able to make it larger/smaller later (I guess that's the only benefit to the other method).

PS..'peyote' is pronounced PAY-O-TEE....like the cactus/drug. LOL. Girl on the vid said it wrong.



#9 phobia

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 02:44 AM EST


With the peyote stitch its a little different in the look though, its flat on the top and bottom of the bracelet; as opposed to the zig-zag thing you get with regular multis



#10 LilRaverBoi

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 02:16 PM EST


Hmmmm....intriguing. Then I've really only done this pattern before when I made the straps on my kandi shirt. Honestly, I still think it looks basically the same. Yeah, it is smooth at the top vs zig-zagy, but the overall pattern is identical.

And as for terminology, from what I've heard 'multi' is made with several strings/rows of beads....like several singles connected but with spaces and spots where both strings go through a single bead. The tutorial you posted is what I call a 'cuff.' I'm not gonna say either of us is wrong...merely regional differences. I'm pretty sure I got my terminology from a kandi website back in the day. Maybe I'm just oldskool! LOL.







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